Article: Public safety and smart cities: How assistive AI will help

Innovation, Open Space

Public safety and smart cities: How assistive AI will help

Over recent years, advancements in artificial intelligence (AI) have greatly increased the safety of our communities. The technology helps emergency managers predict and mitigate flooding, wildfires, and other natural disasters. It improves image and video analysis, saving investigators’ valuable time and reducing errors. It aids crime analysts by pouring through vast amounts of data and making connections that can empower policing.

While AI has expanded its role in our everyday lives, many cities are only just beginning to scratch the surface when it comes to the benefits that the technology can provide. With the next few years likely to breed even more innovation, we can expect to rely increasingly on AI to further help save time, money, and, most importantly, lives.

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Article: Google Arts & Culture’s open source Woolaroo app uses AI to help preserve endangered languages

Language, Open Data

Google Arts & Culture’s open source Woolaroo app uses AI to help preserve endangered languages

There are thousands of different languages spoken around the planet, but a sizable number of these are at risk of disappearing. In fact, of the over 7,000 native languages currently in use, some 3,000 are in danger, and on average, a language becomes extinct every fourteen days.

Google Arts & Culture is taking action to help preserve these endangered languages. Its new Woolaroo app is an open-source photo-translation platform powered by Google Cloud that makes use of machine learning and image recognition.

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Article: Moab Free Health Clinic And Governor Spencer Cox Aim To Address Health Inequalities In The State

Cures, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

Moab Free Health Clinic And Governor Spencer Cox Aim To Address Health Inequalities In The State

The Moab Free Health Clinic is an unassuming building nestled between a corner store and a thrift shop on Moab’s west side of town. Hundreds of uninsured and underinsured rural Utahans’ pass through its doors each year.

Kolby Williams is the clinic’s community navigation coordinator. Williams said the clinic is on track to serve a record number of patients in 2021, and they’re now looking beyond the doctor’s office to do more for public health.

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Article: A new tool hopes to uncover the lost ancestry of enslaved African Americans

History, Open Data
Isaac Granger Jefferson, Virginia (c. 1845)

A new tool hopes to uncover the lost ancestry of enslaved African Americans

I would give everything I own for the chance to interview Mary Jen Burton Jessie. My mother’s grandmother was born in 1875 near Aiken, South Carolina, 12 years after President Abraham Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. Without ever seeing a picture or drawing of her, I visualize a stocky build, prominent cheekbones, rounded shoulders. All physical trademarks courtesy of my maternal side.

And if I thought my mother Eloise got carried away by birthing 10 children, Mary Jen one-upped her. The 11 surviving children she and Henry Jessie created are half the leaves on part of my family tree I’ve been able to pluck and prune together since joining Ancestry.com back in 2018.

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Article: New database tracks data on slaves, slavers, and allies

History, Open Data, Open Source

New database tracks data on slaves, slavers, and allies

Vele was 16 when she embarked a slave ship in 1832 at Cameroons River in West Africa. Precillia Cozzens, 35, was registered as a slave in New Orleans in 1846. Domingos, age 6, was listed in an inventory of enslaved people at Aguiar Plantation, Brazil, in 1806.

The records of these three are among more than 750,000 of people, places, events, and sources available to search in a new open-source database called Enslaved: Peoples of the Historical Slave Trade (Enslaved.org), a repository of information and stories about those who were enslaved or enslavers, worked in the slave trade, or helped emancipate enslaved people. The entries run from the 15th century to the late 1800s and span Western Europe, Africa, and North and South America.

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Article: Open-source mungbean genetic information website enables better varieties

Food, Open Provisioning

Open-source mungbean genetic information website enables better varieties

Scientists and mungbean growers around the world now have access to an open-source website containing the latest genetic information on the qualities of 560 accessions of mungbean. The new website, from QUT’s Centre for Tropical Crops and Biocommodities, provides a database of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genetic markers which can be used to map a variety of traits like disease resistance and yield.

Professor Sagadevan Mundree said the website’s information was open-source to give breeders and research scientists access to new genetic knowledge on important mungbean traits to produce better varieties for Australia’s mungbean growers.

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Article: Children Synthesize Two Dollar Version of Martin Shkreli’s $750 Malaria Drug

Drugs, Materials, Open Health, Open Manufacturing, Open Source

Children Synthesize Two Dollar Version of Martin Shkreli’s $750 Malaria Drug

On 30 November 2016, the Sydney Morning Herald reported on a of a class of high school boys from the Sydney Grammar School, who (as part of a collaboration with university scientists) synthesized pyrimethamine, the active ingredient in the drug Daraprim (once used as an antimalarial, now primarily used to treat toxoplasmosis and cystoisosporiasis).

Daraprim gained notoriety in September 2015, when Turing Pharmaceuticals (then run by Martin Shkreli) purchased the rights to its distribution and raised its price from $13.50 a tablet to $750.00.

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