Article: Have I Been Pwned: Collaborating with FBI and Open Source Publishing

Access, Open Decision-Support

Have I Been Pwned: Collaborating with FBI and Open Source Publishing

The free project for checking leaked access data Have I Been Pwned is now receiving considerable support from the US secret service FBI: The agency will provide the project with leaked data from its own inventory. In addition, the source code of the HIBP service is to be made accessible as open source software. The project operator Troy Hunt writes on his blog.

FBI wants to incorporate data from its own findings. Hunt had spoken to the FBI about ways of further cooperation, he writes in his blog post. It had been agreed that the authority would allow leaked passwords from its own investigations to flow into the HIBP project. As recently as April, when the Emotet Trojan was broken up, the FBI sent Hunt over 4 million e-mail addresses, which were then incorporated into HIBP.

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Article: What’s the point of open source without contributors? Turns out, there are several

Open Software, Open Source

What’s the point of open source without contributors? Turns out, there are several

Single-vendor open source projects are somewhat common, but are they actually “open source” in any useful sense of that term? It’s often said that open source is as much about community as code, but in a project with all committers and maintainers sitting behind the same firewall, there’s no real contributor community. So why bother with open source at all?

The first reason may have nothing to do with community, but everything to do with posterity. According to Steven Rostedt, “To allow their product to continue even when the company is gone. How many times have you lost good products due to the company failing? That is what builds trust with your customers.” Or, perhaps put another way, if the code is open source, the customer need not trust the developer of the code. The license doesn’t guarantee that the code will be well-maintained, but it does guarantee its availability.

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Article: ‘Electric Zine Maker’ Thrives as a Creative Open Source DIY Tool

Code, Open Software, Open Source

‘Electric Zine Maker’ Thrives as a Creative Open Source DIY Tool

When the pandemic hit, I decided to document the day-to-day life during this moment of turmoil and uncertainty as a grounding practice. I started making quarantine zines out of folded A4 sheets of paper, writing things like “I hate being scared of human contact, and I hate what this might mean for me long term” in black pen, attempting to give lockdown days some kind of coherent shape.

This project soon dwindled as the very thought of creating something out of abject loneliness and desperation became too overwhelming.

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Article: Elon Musk says people can now buy a Tesla with bitcoin

Money, Open Governance, Open Source

Elon Musk says people can now buy a Tesla with bitcoin

Tesla CEO Elon Musk announced late Tuesday that it is now possible to buy Tesla vehicles in the U.S. with bitcoin. The automaker last month revealed that it had bought $1.5 billion worth of bitcoin and that it would soon start accepting the world’s most popular cryptocurrency as a form of payment.

“You can now buy a Tesla with Bitcoin,” tweeted Musk, who was officially made the “Technoking of Tesla” this month.People outside the U.S. will be able to buy a Tesla with bitcoin “later this year,” Musk said, without specifying which countries.In order to accept the payment, Musk said Tesla is using “internal” and “open source software.”

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Article: Is TensorFlow ‘for Boomers’? PyTorch May Gain More Ground in Machine Translation

Free, Libre, Open Software, Open Source

Is TensorFlow ‘for Boomers’? PyTorch May Gain More Ground in Machine Translation

PyTorch, the open source framework used to build machine learning models, including those used for machine translation, released its newest version, 1.8, on March 4, 2021.

According to PyTorch’s official announcement, “highlights include updates for compiler, code optimization, frontend APIs for scientific computing, large scale training for pipeline and model parallelism, and Mobile tutorials.” Prior to this release, PyTorch released version 1.7 in October 2020.

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Article: 5 Examples of How Healthcare Data Analytics Can Save Lives

Cures, Drugs, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

5 Examples of How Healthcare Data Analytics Can Save Lives

William Bruce Cameron once famously wrote, “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted.” And in today’s data-centric business landscape, maxims like this can be necessary reminders that it’s not the data that really matters, it’s what we do with it.

But the parallel between what counts and what can be counted can sometimes converge – especially when it comes to healthcare data analysis. So here are five cases where healthcare data insight has led to meaningful action.

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Article: Real-Time Data Analytics Tool Helps Track, Treat Drug Abuse

Cures, Drugs, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

Real-Time Data Analytics Tool Helps Track, Treat Drug Abuse

A team at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) has developed a real-time data analytics tool to help treatment centers and counselors identify and treat drug abuse.  Nonprofits trying to help users overcome their addiction often have a difficult time getting real-time, actionable information on the fast-changing, underground culture of drug abuse.

Using machine learning and data analytics, researchers at NJIT have created DrugTracker, a community-focused drug abuse monitoring and support system.  DrugTracker monitors online platforms such as Twitter and Reddit and combines this information with geospatial data to find out where users are obtaining drugs, as well as trends or changes in the landscape.

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Article: Digital Data Helps Public Health Departments Keep Tabs on, Tackle the Flu

Cures, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

Digital Data Helps Public Health Departments Keep Tabs on, Tackle the Flu

No one needs a reminder that this flu season was one of the worst in recent years. Preliminary data from the Centers for Disease Control suggests it may have been worse than the 2009 season, when the swine flu pandemic strain swept the country.

The good news, however, is that digital data is helping researchers and public health organizations provide more timely predictions about the spread of the flu and assessments of seasons in progress. The advantage is that public health officials no longer have to wait for a Monday-morning quarterback approach to flu season, but can stay on top of its spread as it happens.

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Article: Weighing Open Source’s Worth for the Future of Big Data

Open Data, Open Source

Weighing Open Source’s Worth for the Future of Big Data

The open source software movement began in earnest 20 years ago, when a group of technology leaders in Silicon Valley coined the term as an alternative to the repugnant “free software.” Fast forward to 2018, and the concept has been cemented in our psyches. But does open source have the staying power to drive the next 20 years’ worth of innovation?

There was, of course, open source software before 1998. Linus Torvalds created the first Linux kernel in the open back in 1991, and even IBM engaged in sharing of operating system internals going back into the 1950

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Article: A City Is Not a Computer

Cities, Innovation, Open Space

A City Is Not a Computer

“What should a city optimize for?” Even in the age of peak Silicon Valley, that’s a hard question to take seriously. (Hecklers on Twitter had a few ideas, like “fish tacos” and “pez dispensers.”) 1 Look past the sarcasm, though, and you’ll find an ideology on the rise. The question was posed last summer by Y Combinator — the formidable tech accelerator that has hatched a thousand startups, from AirBnB and Dropbox to robotic greenhouses and wine-by-the-glass delivery — as the entrepreneurs announced a new research agenda: building cities from scratch. Wired’s verdict: “Not Actually Crazy.” 

Which is not to say wise. For every reasonable question Y Combinator asked — “How can cities help more of their residents be happy and reach their potential?” — there was a preposterous one: “How should we measure the effectiveness of a city (what are its KPIs)?”

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