Article: A redux of the Linux movement in open source pharma

Drugs, Open Health

A redux of the Linux movement in open source pharma

Thirty years ago, a 21-year-old student at the University of Helsinki put out a message on a bulletin board, “i am doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big or professional..),” and asked for feedback.

Little did he know that these few words would be the beginning of a gigantic revolution that would transform digital life around the world. This was the birth of the free operating system that came to be known as Linux, named after the kid, Linus Torvalds, who invented it.

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Article: Flying on Mars fueled with open-source software

Code, Free, Innovation, Open Software, Open Space

Flying on Mars fueled with open-source software

For the first time in history, we’ve flown an aircraft, the mini-helicopter Ingenuity, on another planet. Opens-source software backed up its engineering. A small miracle happened at 3:31am ET on Monday morning. Ingenuity, a tiny NASA helicopter, became the first powered aircraft to fly on another planet, Mars. This engineering feat was done with Linux, open-source software, and a NASA-built program based on the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s (JPL) open-source  (pronounced F prime) framework.

At 11-light minutes from Earth, there was nothing easy about this. True, Mars has only a third of Earth’s gravity, but Mars’ atmosphere has only one-hundredth of the density of Earth’s air.

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Article: Open Source Advocates Want Share of Wealth

Code, Open Governance, Open Software, Open Source, Standards

Open Source Advocates Want Share of Wealth

survey of 4,440 developers who actively participated in open source projects in 2020 finds more than half (54%) of respondents said they feel that individuals should be paid for their contributions to open source projects. The report, conducted by DigitalOcean, a cloud service provider, finds only 14% of respondents are currently paid for their contributions.

Developer opinions vary, depending on age group, about whether individuals should be paid for their contributions to open source, with those between the ages of 18-25 being more likely to be in favor (60%), while only 34% of those aged 55 or above agreed.

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Article: The power of open source: why it underpins digital transformation

History, Innovation, Open Data, Open Space

The power of open source: why it underpins digital transformation

It’s not possible to go very far in IT without encountering the term “open source”. For non-IT people, open source is simply software for which the source code has been made freely available for modification and enhancement by anyone, with its creator waiving any rights to profit from its use by others.

Open source software is ubiquitous. Source code controls the computer programs and applications that our technology runs on, making it part of almost everything we do—from the cars we drive to the mobile phones we use.

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Article: Weighing Open Source’s Worth for the Future of Big Data

Open Data, Open Source

Weighing Open Source’s Worth for the Future of Big Data

The open source software movement began in earnest 20 years ago, when a group of technology leaders in Silicon Valley coined the term as an alternative to the repugnant “free software.” Fast forward to 2018, and the concept has been cemented in our psyches. But does open source have the staying power to drive the next 20 years’ worth of innovation?

There was, of course, open source software before 1998. Linus Torvalds created the first Linux kernel in the open back in 1991, and even IBM engaged in sharing of operating system internals going back into the 1950

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The Emergent Open Source Revolution

Open Source

The Emergent Open Source Revolution

REVOLUTION OS tells the inside story of the hackers who rebelled against the proprietary software model and Microsoft to create GNU/Linux and the Open Source movement.

On June 1, 2001, Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said “Linux is a cancer that attaches itself in an intellectual property sense to everything it touches.”

Microsoft fears GNU/Linux, and rightly so. GNU/Linux and the Open Source & Free Software movements arguably represent the greatest threat to Microsoft’s way of life. Shot in cinemascope on 35mm film in Silicon Valley, REVOLUTION OS tracks down the key movers and shakers behind Linux, and finds out how and why Linux became such a potent threat.

REVOLUTION OS features interviews with Linus Torvalds, Richard Stallman, Bruce Perens, Eric Raymond, Brian Behlendorf, Michael Tiemann, Larry Augustin, Frank Hecker, and Rob Malda. To view the trailer or the first eight minutes go to the ifilm website for REVOLUTION OS.