Article: The benefits of serverless for the banking and financial services industry

Money, Open Governance

The benefits of serverless for the banking and financial services industry

The financial services industry, like many industries, is currently undergoing a radical shift. In addition to the change to all-digital transactions, customers have come to expect comprehensive services that are able to meet their needs when, where and how they want them. In order to keep up with rapidly changing customer demands and remain compliant with industry regulations, financial services organizations must have the right IT infrastructure and processes in place.

And, as cloud-native—and more specifically, Kubernetes-native—development techniques continue to become the norm, the way developers at financial institutions work must also change, to a cloud-first approach. More and more, implementing a serverless architecture is what makes sense for financial organizations as they continue to transform their focus more on customer demands than IT infrastructure.

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Article: Top 6 Open-Source Networking Projects For a Cloud-Native World

Free, Libre, Open Software, Open Source

Top 6 Open-Source Networking Projects For a Cloud-Native World

With the ever-growing popularity and advantages of cloud and containers, organizations are increasingly adopting cloud-native applications and container-based infrastructure for running their business applications. To efficiently manage cloud infrastructure, networking tools play an important role. Having the right set of networking tools can help the network admin manage and operate the cloud-native apps.  Here are some open-source networking projects network administrators can use for their cloud-native worlds:

  1. Project Calico
  2. Cilium
  3. Envoy
  4. Jaeger
  5. Flannel
  6. Kuma

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Article: IBM introduces IBM Cloud for Financial Services.

Innovation, Money, Open Governance, Open Space

IBM introduces IBM Cloud for Financial Services.

For financial services, the biggest challenge in their journey to the cloud is ensuring they meet various regulatory and compliance requirements. Be it a bank, a fintech company or even an insurance firm, compared to other industries, the number of regulations they have to adhere to can be a lot more complicated. This is because of the sensitivity of the data they are dealing with.

For years, banks and other FSIs have been developing their own applications on their own infrastructure. The demand for better customer experience, digitalised operations, risk reduction and gaining competitive advantage requires applications to be developed, managed and run efficiently. The cloud has proven to be a business enabler to solving challenges and unlocking new revenue opportunities. While access to the private cloud is an option, the growing amount of data and the demand for better services by customers require banks to expand their cloud usage to the public cloud.

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Article: Four Major Open Source Hybrid Cloud Platforms

Free, Libre, Open Software, Open Source

Four Major Open Source Hybrid Cloud Platforms

If you’re building a hybrid cloud today, it’s likelier than not that you are using a proprietary platform, like Azure Arc or AWS Outposts. The modern hybrid cloud ecosystem is dominated by offerings like these.

Yet open source hybrid cloud solutions are quietly holding their own, providing an alternative for organizations wary of committing to a proprietary platform for setting up and managing a hybrid cloud.

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Article: 7 Ways Open-Source Software Changed the World

History, Open Data

7 Ways Open-Source Software Changed the World

Whether you’re aware of it or not, open-source software has had an impact on the way you live your life. You may know of open source programs that are free to download and available for anyone to edit. But do you know how the term “open source” began?

The phrase comes from a movement in the late 90s to rebrand free software in a more ethically neutral way. Two men involved in this movement, Eric Raymond and Bruce Perens, founded the Open Source Initiative in 1998. This organization maintains an official definition of open source software and works to expand adoption of the concept.

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