Article: 5 Data Science Open-source Projects You Should Consider Contributing to

Innovation, Open Data, Open Source, Open Space

5 Data Science Open-source Projects You Should Consider Contributing to

One of the most crucial aspects of landing your desired role in data science is building a strong, potent, eye-catching portfolio that proves your skills and shows that you can handle large-scale projects and play nicely in a team. Your portfolio needs to prove that you spent the time, effort, and resources to hone your skills as a data scientist.

Proving your skills to someone who doesnt know you, especially in a short time frame — the average time a recruiter spends on a resume or a portfolio is 7~10 seconds — is not easy. However, it’s not impossible either.

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Article: Amazon proposes novel approach to quantum computing error correction

Hardware, Open Manufacturing, Open Source

Amazon proposes novel approach to quantum computing error correction

Researchers at the Amazon Web Services Inc.-led AWS Center for Quantum Computing have published what they say is their first architecture paper today, describing a theoretical blueprint for a fault-tolerant quantum computer. The paper proposes an entirely new and apparently workable approach to the problem of “quantum error correction,” which is a key challenge that must be overcome in order to devise a working quantum computer that can live up to its full potential.

The problem with quantum computers is that they’re incredibly fragile machines. Their potential comes from the fact they use “qubits” to perform computations, rather than the “bits” found in traditional computers. Whereas bits can hold a state of 0 or 1, qubits can be a 0, a 1 or both states at the same time. It’s this property that allows otherwise impossible computations to be performed, making them far more powerful than traditional computers can ever be.

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Article: Mozilla winds down DeepSpeech development, announces grant program

Innovation, Open Space

Mozilla winds down DeepSpeech development, announces grant program

In 2017, Mozilla launched DeepSpeech, an initiative incubated within the machine learning team at Mozilla Research focused on open sourcing an automatic speech recognition model. Over the next four years, the DeepSpeech team released newer versions of the model capable of transcribing lectures, phone conversations, television programs, radio shows, and other live streams with “human accuracy.”

But in the coming months, Mozilla plans to cease development and maintenance of DeepSpeech as the company transitions into an advisory role, which will include the launch of a grant program to fund a number of initiatives demonstrating applications for DeepSpeech.

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Article: This Week in Programming: Microsoft Jumps Back into Java with OpenJDK Build Preview

Code, Open Software, Open Source

This Week in Programming: Microsoft Jumps Back into Java with OpenJDK Build Preview

Who’s ready to get down and party like it’s 1990-something again because Microsoft is taking the internet by storm this week with its scintillating preview of some Java-related tech!

No, no, no, the Microsoft Java Virtual Machine (MJVM) hasn’t risen from the ashes to fight another day, and neither has Visual J++, nor J#. Worry not, dear developer, for all those Microsoft-made Java-esque implementations are buried deep under litigation long past. Rather, this week’s exciting news in the world of Java (aside from the Supreme Court ruling in Oracle v. Google — we touch on that below) is Microsoft’s release of a preview of the Microsoft Build of OpenJDK.

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Article: NLPCloud.io helps devs add language processing smarts to their apps

Language, Open Data, Open Source

NLPCloud.io helps devs add language processing smarts to their apps

While visual ‘no code‘ tools are helping businesses get more out of computing without the need for armies of in-house techies to configure software on behalf of other staff, access to the most powerful tech tools — at the ‘deep tech’ AI coal face — still requires some expert help (and/or costly in-house expertise).

This is where bootstrapping French startup, NLPCloud.io, is plying a trade in MLOps/AIOps — or ‘compute platform as a service’ (being as it runs the queries on its own servers) — with a focus on natural language processing (NLP), as its name suggests.

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Article: The third wave of democratized geospatial knowledge

Geospatial, Open Data

The third wave of democratized geospatial knowledge

Once upon a time, map-making lay in the purview of professional cartographers. Geospatial data analysis was only available to trained analysts using specialized tools. Over the past 25 years, we have seen a dramatic transformation in the geospatial industry, as geospatial data has become democratized and widely available.

The first democratization shift marked the move towards digital maps. Maps became instantly available, personalized, broadly accessible — and free. This phase reached its culmination with the advent of street-level imagery and 3D photographic imagery, giving people the ability to truly visualize a location.

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Article: Use the Fizo Open-Source Project to Build Toy Cars Out of Recyclable Materials

Materials, Open Manufacturing, Open Source

Use the Fizo Open-Source Project to Build Toy Cars Out of Recyclable Materials

What you’re about to witness is known as Fizo. While some designers are busy planning next year’s toys, some designers are hard at work cleaning up last year’s leftovers and transforming them into accessible and easy-to-build projects for children of all ages. Best of all, the Fizo experience is an open-source one.

It all started when three designers, Arthur Murcia, Danilo Makio Saito, and Cauê Oliveira decided to create a toy-making project aimed at raising awareness regarding production processes of common everyday tools and objects. To do so, the team decided to create a recyclable toy project.

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Article: Google’s Win for Open Source

Code, Open Software, Open Source

Google’s Win for Open Source

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court sided with Google over Oracle in a major copyright battle about the “fair use” of code. The ruling is widely seen as a boon to the open-source software movement and may have implications for the cryptocurrency industry. After all, most crypto projects aren’t protected by copyright.

The backstory: When developing the Android operating system, Google ported over 11,000 lines of code from Java SE, a programming environment now owned by Oracle but built by Sun Microsystems. It wanted to ensure interoperability between the platforms. Oracle argued that re-using portions of its API, a sort of bridge between two types of code, was copyright infringement.

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Article: Bad broadband, no problem: Google’s open-source speech codec works on even low quality networks

Innovation, Open Software, Open Source, Open Space

Bad broadband, no problem: Google’s open-source speech codec works on even low quality networks

The Search giant has open-sourced Lyra, an audio codec that taps machine-learning to produce high-quality audio with very little data. In a bid to put an end to the all-too-familiar choppy, robotic voice calls that come with low bandwidth, Google is open-sourcing Lyra, a new audio codec that taps machine-learning to produce high-quality calls even when faced with a dodgy internet connection.

Google’s AI team is making Lyra available for developers to integrate with their communication apps, with the promise that the new tool enables audio calls of a similar quality to that achieved with the most popular existing codecs, while requiring 60% less bandwidth.

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Article: Supreme Court Decision Affirms Open-Source’s Role in Modern Software Development

Open Source

Supreme Court Decision Affirms Open-Source’s Role in Modern Software Development

A Supreme Court ruling that sided with Alphabet Inc.’s Google in its 10-year legal battle with Oracle Corp. reaffirms the business model behind open-source software—sharing bits of computer code for free, experts said. The ruling on Monday said Google did not violate copyright protections when it used lines of Java computer code that allow its Android mobile operating system to connect to other software. Oracle acquired Sun Microsystems Inc., which created Java, in 2010.

Experts said the ruling affirmed the right of companies to freely use one another’s software to some extent, a practice that has been key to innovation and interoperability. Some voiced concern that the line between fair use and copyright infringement was unclear, and that it could make it harder for startups to make a return on their investment.

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