Article: Ushering in the age of greater data demand

Geospatial, Open Data

Ushering in the age of greater data demand

The availability of marine open data infrastructure has significant economic and societal potential for coastal nations to facilitate marine domain interoperability and the World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) best practices for marine spatial data publishing on the Web.

With the recent Indian directive on open data and the reuse of public sector information, IIC Technologies is ideally positioned to serve the Indian coastal and inland waterway segments in facilitating a continuous data capturing of spatial-temporal physical phenomena and human activities in coastal areas and riverbanks, doing the corresponding data analysis, and the decision- making for achieving continual improvement in the marine planning and management processes.

Read Full Article

Article: Is Canada falling behind global peers with open banking?

Money, Open Governance, Open Source

Is Canada falling behind global peers with open banking?

There is a risk that it will says financial services industry group as it publishes an open banking manifesto. Several countries have already gone some way along the route to open banking but is Canada at risk of falling behind its global peers?

The benefits of adopting open banking has been laid out in a new publication from the non-profit Open Banking Initiative Canada (OBIC) which brings together thought leaders from finance, technology, and regulation in partnership with CIO Strategy Council and others.

Read Full Article

Article: The not-so-secret value of sharing commercial geospatial and open-source information

Geospatial, Open Data, Open Source

The not-so-secret value of sharing commercial geospatial and open-source information

Two years ago, reports surfaced that the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) was detaining hundreds of thousands of China’s Muslim Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities in so-called “re-education” camps. Chinese authorities initially denied the existence of these camps until human rights organizations and media sources provided indisputable evidence that they do exist.

Discovering human rights abuses such as this would be nearly impossible without access to commercial geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) provided by satellite imagery that established visual evidence of the camps. Beyond the discovery of the camps, GEOINT also provided the ability to track developments at the camps by comparing images taken over time.

Read Full Article