Article: What’s the point of open source without contributors? Turns out, there are several

Open Software, Open Source

What’s the point of open source without contributors? Turns out, there are several

Single-vendor open source projects are somewhat common, but are they actually “open source” in any useful sense of that term? It’s often said that open source is as much about community as code, but in a project with all committers and maintainers sitting behind the same firewall, there’s no real contributor community. So why bother with open source at all?

The first reason may have nothing to do with community, but everything to do with posterity. According to Steven Rostedt, “To allow their product to continue even when the company is gone. How many times have you lost good products due to the company failing? That is what builds trust with your customers.” Or, perhaps put another way, if the code is open source, the customer need not trust the developer of the code. The license doesn’t guarantee that the code will be well-maintained, but it does guarantee its availability.

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Article: How to pick the right license for your open source project

Open Source

How to pick the right license for your open source project

It’s been decades, and we still can’t help but talk about open source licensing. RedMonk analyst Steven O’Grady is sick of writing about licensing, but we’re apparently not sick of reading about it. And yet the “correct” answer for any would-be open source project lead is relatively simple: the license you choose determines “the kind of community that you’re going to build,”

According to Hassy Veldstra, founder of open source load testing tool Artillery.io. He detailed why Artillery chose the Mozilla Public License (MPL) version 2, and the different paths open to open source projects.

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Article: Artillery: Finding open source success between dev and ops

Code, Open Software, Open Source

Artillery: Finding open source success between dev and ops

Given enough cash and luck, you can manufacture a pop phenomenon like One Direction. But if you want to foster a popular open source project, no amount of cash is going to buy success.

Instead, as Artillery.io founder Hassy Veldstra related in an interview, often the best way to create the next big open source project is to pay attention to how enterprises work, and to look for rough edges that can be smoothed out. In the case of Artillery, an open source load testing tool, that meant focusing on the cross-functional interplay between developers and operations as it relates to software performance.

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Article: Do open source users have a moral obligation to the community? One expert weighs in

Open Decision-Support, Open Source

Do open source users have a moral obligation to the community? One expert weighs in

In open source, we spend so much time talking about licensing that it’s easy to overlook the reality that open source really isn’t about licensing at all. Not the heart of open source, anyway.

At its best, open source is about community and shared mores that prompt us to contribute toward common goals. At its worst open source is about micromanaging and enforcing the behaviors we, as the original author of the software, may desire.

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Article: How open source changed everything — again

History, Open Data

How open source changed everything — again

We’re about to conclude another decade of open source, and what a long, strange trip it has been. Reading back through predictions made in 2009, no one had the foggiest clue that GitHub would change software development forever (and for everyone), or that Microsoft would go from open source pariah to the world’s largest contributor, or a host of other dramatic changes that became the new normal during a decade that was anything but normal.

We are all open sourcerors now as we round out the decade. Let’s look back at some of the most significant open source innovations that got us here.

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