Article: Bio-hackers sidestep Big Pharma with new open-source insulin

Cures, Drugs, Open Health

Bio-hackers sidestep Big Pharma with new open-source insulin

Estimates find that some 10 percent of all Americans have diabetes, but just three companies manufacture the life-saving medicine needed to treat it. That’s believed to explain why diabetes has become the most expensive chronic condition in the United States, with prices doubling between 2012 and 2016.

An organization called Open Insulin hopes to change the calculus by creating open-source alternatives to the insulin made by the Big Three. The non-profit group is producing not only the compositions for insulin, but also hardware equivalents to the production equipment used by major pharmaceutical companies. The idea is that any community around the world could use the instructions to spin up their own small-scale manufacturing and meet local needs.

Read Full Article

Article: CDISC Teams Up with Microsoft to Develop Open-Source Software for the Clinical Research Community

Drugs, Open Decision-Support, Open Health, Procedures (Medical), Research

CDISC Teams Up with Microsoft to Develop Open-Source Software for the Clinical Research Community

CDISC is teaming up with Microsoft to develop the CDISC Open Rules Engine (CORE), open-source software that executes machine-readable CDISC Conformance Rules. The global clinical research community will be able to leverage the CORE software to test study data for conformance to CDISC standards as well as regulatory and sponsor-specific conformance rule sets.

CDISC Conformance Rules as well as regulatory agency rules provide a critical quality check in ensuring study data conform to CDISC standards. An emerging industry best practice is to use Conformance Rules on an ongoing basis, throughout the study, to keep the data as close to submission ready as possible and to ensure quality in all data exchange scenarios.

Read Full Article

Article: ‘Loop’ artificial pancreas software safe, effective with community support

Drugs, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

Loop’ artificial pancreas software safe, effective with community support

The Loop open-source system for a do-it-yourself automated insulin delivery system can be initiated with community-developed resources and used safely and effectively by adults and children with type 1 diabetes, real-world data show.

“This large prospective study of the popular Loop open-source DIY automated insulin delivery system showed that adults and children with type 1 diabetes can successfully initiate the system, use it safely, and improve their glucose control with it,”

Read Full Article

Article: Open-source platform using gene therapy to find a cure for kids with rare diseases

Cures, Drugs, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

Open-source platform using gene therapy to find a cure for kids with rare diseases

The genetic condition that affects Raghav is called Sedaghatian type Spondylometaphyseal Dysplasia (SSMD). SSMD causes cardiac arrhythmia and abnormalities in the skeletal and central nervous system. Doctors said Raghav would be a wheelchair user, non-verbal and likely to die prematurely. A diagnosis that Ramesh, a software engineer with Amazon, and his wife were unwilling to accept.

Along with his work at Amazon, Ramesh started Googling for information regarding the genetic condition that was affecting his son and read up all the relevant literature regarding gene therapy and other treatments that were available on this rare disease.

Read Full Article

Article: A redux of the Linux movement in open source pharma

Drugs, Open Health

A redux of the Linux movement in open source pharma

Thirty years ago, a 21-year-old student at the University of Helsinki put out a message on a bulletin board, “i am doing a (free) operating system (just a hobby, won’t be big or professional..),” and asked for feedback.

Little did he know that these few words would be the beginning of a gigantic revolution that would transform digital life around the world. This was the birth of the free operating system that came to be known as Linux, named after the kid, Linus Torvalds, who invented it.

Read Full Article

Article: Open Source Joins Efforts to Create Gene Therapies for Rare Diseases

Cures, Drugs, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

Open Source Joins Efforts to Create Gene Therapies for Rare Diseases

Some 400 million patients worldwide are affected by more than 7,000 rare diseases; yet treatments for rare genetic diseases remain an underserved area. More than 95 percent of rare diseases do not have an approved treatment, and new treatments are estimated to cost more than $1 billion.

Sanath Ramesh created the RareCamp project and the OpenTreatments Foundation to enable patients to create gene therapies for rare genetic diseases and then work with their doctors and nonprofit organizations to develop drugs. The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, is helping those efforts succeed.

Read Full Article

Article: Why The 21st Century Cures Act is an Innovators Dream

API, Cures, Drugs, Open Health, Open Infrastructure, Procedures (Medical)

Why The 21st Century Cures Act is an Innovators Dream

Designed largely to accelerate medical product development and get new medications and treatments through the development process faster, the 21st Century Cures Act is a significant piece of legislation that  passed in 2016.

Some of its provisions are also meant to empower patients with more information about their own . The ONC Cures Act Final Rule in particular — which will go into effect in April of this year — says that providers must make patients’ electronic health records (EHRs) available to them. This means that data is unequivocally going to be in the hands of patients. It means better care for patients, but it also means that a whole new set of services and innovations will be possible.

Read Full Article

Article: Houston researchers tap into tech to provide new brain-related health care solutions

Cures, Drugs, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

Houston researchers tap into tech to provide new brain-related health care solutions

A University of Houston researcher is tapping into technology to better treat brain injuries and conditions that scientists have not yet figured out treatment for. Badri Roysam, the current chair of electrical and computer engineering at UH and a Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen University Professor, and his team have created a new computational image analysis methods based on deep neural networks.

“We are interested in mapping and profiling unhealthy and drug-treated brain tissue in unprecedented detail to reveal multiple biological processes at once – in context,” Roysam says in a UH press release about his latest paper published in Nature Communications. “This requires the ability to record high-resolution images of brain tissue covering a comprehensive panel of molecular biomarkers, over a large spatial extent, e.g., whole-brain slices, and automated ability to generate quantitative readouts of biomarker expression for all cells.”

Read Full Article

Article: AI Predicts Effective Drug Combinations to Fight Complex Diseases Faster

Cures, Drugs, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

AI Predicts Effective Drug Combinations to Fight Complex Diseases Faster

Finding new ways to repurpose or combine existing drugs has proved to be a powerful tool to treat complex diseases. Drugs used to treat one type of cancer, for instance, have effectively strengthened treatments for other cancer cells. Complex malignant tumors often require a combination of drugs or “drug cocktails,” to formulate a concerted attack on multiple cell types. Drug cocktails can not only help stave off drug resistance but also minimize harmful side effects.

But finding an effective combination of existing drugs at the right dose is extremely challenging, partly because there are near-infinite possibilities.

Read Full Article

Article: Linux Foundation sigstore finds ‘origins’ in software supply chains

Cures, Drugs, Open Health, Procedures (Medical)

Linux Foundation sigstore finds ‘origins’ in software supply chains

Zuellig Pharma’s eZTracker leverages blockchain to help countries get up to speed with their vaccination programmes and to counter the threat of counterfeit vaccines. Take a peek behind the curtain and learn how the smartphone app, powered by SAP’s blockchain platform, lets consumers verify the authenticity of a drug.

Designed to improves the security of the software supply chain, sigstore is said to enable the adoption of cryptographic software signing backed by transparency log technologies. Software application development professionals will be able to securely sign software artifacts such as release files, container images and binaries.

Read Full  Article