Article: CDISC Teams Up with Microsoft to Develop Open-Source Software for the Clinical Research Community

Drugs, Open Decision-Support, Open Health, Procedures (Medical), Research

CDISC Teams Up with Microsoft to Develop Open-Source Software for the Clinical Research Community

CDISC is teaming up with Microsoft to develop the CDISC Open Rules Engine (CORE), open-source software that executes machine-readable CDISC Conformance Rules. The global clinical research community will be able to leverage the CORE software to test study data for conformance to CDISC standards as well as regulatory and sponsor-specific conformance rule sets.

CDISC Conformance Rules as well as regulatory agency rules provide a critical quality check in ensuring study data conform to CDISC standards. An emerging industry best practice is to use Conformance Rules on an ongoing basis, throughout the study, to keep the data as close to submission ready as possible and to ensure quality in all data exchange scenarios.

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Article: A decade of digital evolution to help reporting revolutions at ICIJ

Access, Document, Open Decision-Support, Research

A decade of digital evolution to help reporting revolutions at ICIJ

Five years ago, on May 9, 2016, the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists published the details of more than 200,000 offshore entities from the Panama Papers to the Offshore Leaks Database. The addition of so much previously secret tax haven data was the culmination of more than 12 months of rigorous analysis and processing of one of the world’s largest data leaks.

But it wasn’t ICIJ’s first time working with data sets on a scale unseen in traditional journalism. Five years prior, even before ICIJ officially had a data team, director Gerard Ryle obtained a set of 2.5 million files — at the time the largest of its kind in history — that would eventually become the Offshore Leaks investigation, published in 2013.

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Article: Use single-cell biology to shed light on pediatric diseases currently in the dark

Cures, Document, Open Decision-Support, Open Health, Research

Use single-cell biology to shed light on pediatric diseases currently in the dark

There are few things harder for a physician to say to a patient than “I don’t know what’s wrong.” Saying that is even harder when you’re sitting across from the parent of a child with an undiagnosed condition.

And as I learned from experience, it is harder still when you work at a national referral center for rare pediatric diseases, since you are a family’s last hope: the physician they’re seeing after they’ve spent months — even years — searching for help and exhausting every other option. My heart broke every time I had to say, “I’m so sorry, but I don’t know what’s wrong.”

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Article: 90% of radiology residents rely on two online resources for help during their on-call shifts

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90% of radiology residents rely on two online resources for help during their on-call shifts

Nearly 90% of radiology residents now rely on two specific online resources for guidance during their on-call shifts, new data published in Clinical Imaging suggests.

There’s been a growing trend towards ramping up 24-hour emergency radiology attending coverage for trainees, yet some studies report nearly 65% of residency programs still lack overnight help. And those looking for quick assistance overwhelming turn to open-source website Radiopaedia and paid service STATdx in these situations, researchers reported May 6.

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Article: Zymo Research Releases Open-Source Bioinformatics Pipeline for SARS-CoV-2 Variant Detection in Wastewater

Open Decision-Support, Research

Zymo Research Releases Open-Source Bioinformatics Pipeline for SARS-CoV-2 Variant Detection in Wastewater

Zymo Research has released the VirSieve Bioinformatics Pipeline source code to the environmental microbiology community to promote global collaboration and support for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 variants in wastewater.

VirSieve is an automated computational pipeline that analyzes sequencing reads from the SARS-CoV-2 virus in wastewater samples to better understand viral variants present in monitored communities. By rating the confidence interval in observed viral mutations, the software has the potential to significantly increase the accuracy of analyzing any changes in the viral genetic material.

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Article: Read & Publish agreement confirmed between The Company of Biologists and EIFL

Access, Document, Open Decision-Support, Research

Read & Publish agreement confirmed between The Company of Biologists and EIFL

From Albania to Zimbabwe, researchers in 30 developing and transition economy countries can benefit from immediate and fee-free Open Access publishing in The Company of Biologists’ subscription journals following a Read & Publish agreement with Electronic Information for Libraries (EIFL).

This landmark agreement runs until 31 December 2023 and institutional members of EIFL-partner library consortia in eligible countries can participate free of charge. Researchers in eligible counties will be able to publish an uncapped number of Open Access research articles in Development, Journal of Cell Science and Journal of Experimental Biology without paying an article processing charge (APC). They will also benefit from free and unlimited access to the journals and their archives dating back to 1853.

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Article: Open-Source COVID-19 ML Datasets; Models; Tools for Data Scientists

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Open-Source COVID-19 ML Datasets; Models; Tools for Data Scientists

As Covid-19 has impacted almost all countries, data scientists and researchers have come up with different predictive models to predict the spread of disease so that it can help the respective governments to come up with suitable plans and policies to curb the spread.

In this context, it becomes essential for data scientists and analysts to know the most popular and useful models that have been proposed as an outcome of the research, as well as get familiar with different datasets available on the internet.

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Article: What’s peer review? 5 things you should know before covering research

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What’s peer review? 5 things you should know before covering research

As scholars and other experts rush to release new research aimed at better understanding the coronavirus pandemic, newsrooms must be more careful than ever in vetting the biomedical studies they choose to cover. One of the first steps journalists should take to gauge the quality of all types of research is answering this important question: Has the paper undergone peer review?

Peer review is a formal process through which researchers evaluate and provide feedback on one another’s work, ideally filtering out flawed and low-quality studies while strengthening others. Academic journals generally do not publish papers that have not survived the process.

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Article: Why some researchers oppose unrestricted sharing of coronavirus data

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Why some researchers oppose unrestricted sharing of coronavirus data

“I was up all last night,” says Nnaemeka Ndodo, a molecular bioengineer at the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (CDC) in Abuja. He sequences coronavirus genomes during the day, and then analyses and uploads the results to an online database at night, working tirelessly alongside his colleagues. “We don’t know Saturday, we don’t know Sunday,” he says.

Researchers around the world are racing to spot variants of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 so that they can determine whether the mutated viruses will evade vaccines or make COVID-19 deadlier. Like many scientists, Ndodo shares SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences in a popular data repository, GISAID, that requires users to sign in and to credit those whose data they analyse.

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Article: Health research council moves to mandate immediate open access

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Health research council moves to mandate immediate open access

Australian council releases discussion paper on immediate open-access publication of research it funds Australia’s National Health and Medical Research Council has proposed that immediate open-access publication of research resulting from its grants should become mandatory.

The council already requires researchers to list their patents on the government’s SourceIP website, but its existing policy allows a 12-month delay to open-access publication of NHMRC-funded research. The proposed reforms would involve researchers publishing in open repositories, circumventing publishers’ fees, as well as publishing in traditional journals. Authors would be required to retain the rights to publish and share their work. It would also encourage researchers to release non-peer-reviewed preprints.

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